Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Dogs, Cats, Romance & Christmas


Congratulations to "Donna E." the winner of Edie's giveaway. Thank you to all who participated!

I love dogs, cats and romance in books. I was putting all of this and a sprinkle of magic into my last series, Miracle Interrupted, but after five books, I wanted to give the cats and dogs a bigger role in every book. And because my dog and cat are from rescue associations, I wanted to go with that. 


That’s how my Rescued Hearts series was born, and I’m loving it. There’s a dog and cat in Christmas at Angel Lake, the second book of the series. Though the cat creates the inciting event in the book, the dog is a point of view character. In the first book of the series, Hearts in Motion, the point of view animal is a cat. A very wise cat. In my current book, I have a grumpy cat. She just joined the book recently, so I’m not sure of her impact, but I’m having fun with her.

And then there’s Christmas. There’s just something extra special about a Christmas romance, and I’ve wanted to write one for a while. When you pick one up, it’s with the expectation that it will have a heartwarming ending. This is one of my favorite books I’ve written, so I feel very happy about it.

CHRISTMAS AT ANGEL LAKE

**25 cents from every CHRISTMAS AT ANGEL LAKE book sold will go to the Washington County Humane Society in Wisconsin.**

A kitten saved her…

Broke, pregnant and deserted by her boyfriend, Maddie Barrymore swerves to avoid a kitten while driving in a Wisconsin blizzard—and her life takes another turn. Like Puss in Boots, she stays in an empty house. She has the baby, the kitten, gets a job and a degree…yet every day she’s ready to flee if the real owner shows up.

Five years later, he does…

Dumped by the woman he loves, film producer Logan MacLeesh’s heart is as dark as one of his movies. He plans to hole up in his grandmother’s old mansion and throw himself into his work…until he discovers the sexy squatter and her four-year-old son. Before he can call the sheriff, Maddie’s tale of how she ended up there entertains him. They make a deal that as long as she tells him a story every night, she and her son can stay. Even the cat, though Logan’s always been a dog person.

A dog in need of saving…

Far away in another state, a homeless dog lifts his head, sniffs…and smells him. The human who’s meant for him. As he heads through the snow toward the scent, his journey seems impossible, even though it’s Christmas, a time when miracles happen.

Buy links:
Amazon http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FG92FOE/
B&N http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/christmas-at-angel-lake-edie-ramer/1116993588?ean=2940148588412
Kobo http://store.kobobooks.com/en-US/ebook/christmas-at-angel-lake
Smashwords https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/361695

Giveaway:
I’m giving away an ebook of Hearts in Motion, the first Rescued Hearts book to one commenter. Just let me know what are your favorite things in a romance?

Happy reading!

Edie
www.edieramer.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/edieramer.author
Twitter: https://twitter.com/edieramer

Giveaway ends 11:59pm EST Oct. 23rd. Please supply your email in the post. You may use spaces or full text for security. (ex. jsmith at gmail dot com) If you do not wish to supply your email, or have trouble posting, please email maureen@JustContemporaryRomance.com with a subject title of JCR GIVEAWAY to be entered in the current giveaway.

33 comments:

  1. My favorite parts romance is the journey we see the hero/heroine take to their HEA! With different types of storylines, I love seeing how things progress, especially in stories like opposites attracting or friends to lovers.

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    1. Ada, I love the different journeys, too. I like variety in books - and any form of entertainment.

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  2. Favorite things, there are so many! Happily ever afters are the most important though, no question. And I like how characters mesh their different lives together to become a unit.

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    1. Anita, I need either "happily ever after" ending or a "hopeful" ending. In my mind, I always work it out to be "happily ever after." :)

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  3. Maureen, thanks for having me as a guest today. It looks wonderful!

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  4. Some of my favorite things....hmmm..lets see I love small town romances, when animals are involved in the story, single parents falling in love and I love a good sassy heroine who stands up for herself. My favorite parts of the story are always when the couple first realize their attraction to one another. I still remember the moment I realized my hubby and I were moving towards being more than friends so I guess that's why I love to read about others happy moments!
    This series sounds awesome and I don't know how Ive missed it so far! Im definitely going to check it out tho!

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    1. Karen, we have a lot of favorite things in common. and I love that moment of attractions, too.

      I hope you enjoy my books!

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    2. I'm sure I will! I just picked up a couple of the miracle interrupted books and I can't wait to start them! :)

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    3. Karen, you're so sweet! I hope you enjoy them!

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  5. Well, of course, the HEA is the main thing in a romance. But the getting there is usually what sets one romance against another. And I don't know that I have any particular favored elements ----- I do like second chances at love; I do like opposites who clash, but eventually realize they belong together; single parent(s) - sometimes the child(ren) being the catalyst bringing them together; and I like a bit of mystery or suspense in the relationship, or in the events surrounding the couple. I think animals can also be an element of romance building.
    donna(dot)durnell(at)sbcglobal(dot)net

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    1. Donna, there are so many possibilities and so much to like. And I know some authors who can write pretty much anything, and they're so good that I'll love elements I normally hate.

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  6. My favorite things in a romance novel are the characters...do they click? The sparks between them...The tenderness between them..of course the love scenes can have some heat but don't have to be too hot..it's nice but not always necessary...I like romance and sweet too...

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    1. Mona, tender and sweet are my favorite love scenes, too. And I definitely need the click between the characters. :)

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  7. Hi Edie - Everything! I love so much about romance books. Romance makes you all warm and fuzzy, especially on cold nights in a warm house at Christmas. Congrats on your release. I loved it! It is probably my favorite one of yours that I have read so far. (Don't put me in the drawing - just wanted to show some comment love). :-)

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    1. Amy, thanks for stopping by and your comment love! It's one of my favorites, too. I hope that my next one lives up to it. I'm writing something unexpected, and I always like it when that happens.

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  8. I am going to throw out a different idea.... in a romance novel I like secondary people amd places. A heroine can tell a lot about a guy (hero) in how he interacts with Loopy Aunt Lucy. The hero can tell a lot about a gal (heroine) in how she responds to a guys night only poker game. The secondary characters give depth to the main couples story. Or ar least that's my story and I'm sticking to it. :)
    Julie O
    jo1963jo at gmail dot com

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    1. Julie, I like interesting secondary characters, too, especially if they aren't stereotypes. I like unexpected ones. An aunt who used to be an exotic dancer might be fun. I just thought of that. Maybe I'll use that in a future book. I might put in a guys night poker game, too, to see what my heroine would do. :)

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    2. An ex stripper Aunt that doesn't realize she's past her prime and crashes the poker game in her g-string. LOL
      Julie

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    3. Snort! Julie, are you a writer? That's a good one. lol

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    4. Only a writer in my head Edie..I don't have the discipline ro make myself sit and make it the written word. I admire authors and their dedication. But, if reading was a sport I would be a captain on the extreme team.
      Julie



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    5. Julie, I think all writers start with a love of books. I don't have as much time to read as I used to, otherwise I could be a member of your team. :)

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  9. the HEA and when the characters first meet

    bn100candg at hotmail dot com

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  10. Hi BN! I love great HEA endings, the kind that make me sigh and leave me feeling wonderful.

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  11. Christmas and animals would be right up there. I love setting. I don't want pages telling me what a house or cemetery looks like, but I like it when an author can make the setting a character itself. I like when a protagonist's growth is shown through the setting. She views the setting differently in the end versus the beginning and this demonstrates her growth, be it a cemetery, a haunted house, whatever.

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    1. Eliza, you and Liz K think the same way about setting. I think you do it even more than her. Though I don't go into depth about setting, I'm always conscious of grounding the reader and give enough details for the reader to create visuals.

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    2. The one that always comes to mind for me is Tara in Gone With the Wind. The plantation was a character in itself and demonstrated Scarlet's growth and character. To me a setting should be given as much time to develop as a character. If you can take a character from the story and plop them down in another setting without adjusting the plot or characters then the setting isn't doing it's job. Obviously it's one of my favorite things to write. :-)

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    3. Eliza, in Gone With the Wind, definitely the plantation was a character in itself. But the setting isn't a character in my books. If there's too much description in a book, I tend to skim scenes. Sorry! But, hey, at least we have a love of cats in common. :)

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    4. If there's too much description then the author isn't doing it right. To me, the setting shouldn't have any more description given to it than a character. What I mean is that the setting "interacts" with the main characters, demonstrates their growth, and has a purpose--becomes a character itself. I never give more than a few lines here and there to describing a setting. Maybe that makes more sense for what I'm saying. :-) I skim description no matter what it abouts, just like I skim sex scenes. Ha! We definitely have cats in common!

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    5. I think it depends on the uniqueness of the place. A cemetery in Paris would be very unique, and I'd describe that. But a small two-story house in my current wip won't need a lot of description. I briefly mention the bright colors in the living room in one scene, and that's to show the heroine's character. Of course, this is the first draft, and everything can change later.

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  12. I love how the H/H have in the beginning the love/hate relationship going on and by the time they have discovered their feelings for each other, the roadblock halting their admissions comes into play. I love cheering for them to get together

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    1. I agree, though most of my books don't have that love/hate relationship. I usually have other things going on in my books that keep the h/h apart. But I'm reading a book right now with that adversarial relationship, and I'm loving it. :)

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  13. I love the small town feel. I like when the secondary characters add fun and quirkiness.

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    1. Laurie, love your kitty gravatar! The secondary characters in my Rescued Hearts series are likely to be cats and dogs. Christmas at Angel Lake is set in a small town, and it does have fun and quirky secondary characters who are people, too.

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